Station Name: AINSWORTH ROAD

[Source: Paul Wright and Alan Young]

Date opened: 1.1.1918
Location: West side of Ainsworth Road
Company on opening: Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway
Date closed to passengers: 21.9.1953
Date closed completely: 21.9.1953
Company on closing: British Railways (London Midland Region)
Present state: Demolished
County: Lancashire
OS Grid Ref: SD776084
Date of visit: 28.8.2010

Notes: Ainsworth Road Halt was situated on the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway’s (LYR) 1¼-mile Bradley Fold Junction – Radcliffe South Junction line. The double-track line was opened on 1 December 1879 to provide a direct link between the Manchester, Whitefield and Radcliffe line and Bolton via Bradley Fold (on the Liverpool and Bury railway which had opened on 20 November 1848). When the line opened there were no intermediate stations but passenger services did operate over it the December 1895 timetable showing 13 up and 12 down trains on Monday-to-Friday. On Saturday there was an extra down train and on Sunday there were three up and one down. The services ran between Manchester Victoria and Bolton via Whitefield.

The On 17 April 1916 the LYR had introduced an electric train service onto the Manchester, Whitefield and Radcliffe line (between Manchester Victoria and Bury Bolton Street). Following the introduction of the electric trains all of the services from Bolton terminated at Radcliffe. A rail-motor was used on the service and the halt at Ainsworth Road was opened on 1 January 1918 to serve it.

It was located in a cutting on the west side of Ainsworth Road. The road was carried over the line by means of an iron span bridge and sloping footpaths led down to track level. Simple low level platforms were provided and at first there was no form of shelter.

On 1 January 1922 Ainsworth Road Halt became part of the London & North Western Railway (LNWR).

The July 1922 timetable showed thirteen up (Radcliffe direction) and fourteen down (Bolton direction) trains Monday-to-Friday. On Saturdays there were fourteen trains in each direction but no trains called on Sundays. All of the trains offered only third class seating and they ran between Bolton Trinity Street and Radcliffe.

The LNWR was absorbed into the London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) on 1 January 1923. The LMS Summer timetable for 1932 showed 12 up and 13 down trains on Monday-to-Friday. On Saturday there was an extra service in each direction as shown in the table below. No trains ran on Sundays and all trains were one class only rail-motors.

Up Trains – Summer 1932

Destination

Down trains – Summer 1932

Destination

8.17am

Radcliffe

8.40am

Bolton Trinity Street

9.22am

Radcliffe

9.40am

Bolton Trinity Street

10.17am

Radcliffe

10.39am

Bolton Trinity Street

11.22am

Radcliffe

11.47am

Bolton Trinity Street

12.22pm

Radcliffe

12.51pm

Bolton Trinity Street

1.55pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Radcliffe

2.19pm

Bolton Trinity Street

2.07pm (Saturdays Only)

Radcliffe

3.36pm

Bolton Trinity Street

3.12pm (Saturdays Only)

Radcliffe

4.24pm (Saturdays Only)

Bolton Trinity Street

3.19pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Radcliffe

5.16pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Bolton Trinity Street

4.08pm

Radcliffe

5.34pm (Saturdays Only)

Bolton Trinity Street

5.17pm (Saturdays Only)

Radcliffe

6.34pm

Bolton Trinity Street

6.18pm

Radcliffe

7.55pm

Bolton Trinity Street

7.34pm

Radcliffe

8.38pm

Bolton Trinity Street

8.27pm

Radcliffe

9.44pm

Bolton Trinity Street

9.32pm

Radcliffe

10.49pm

Bolton Trinity Street

10.32pm

Radcliffe

During the early 1930s the LMS built timber faced platforms at Ainsworth Road and provided a waiting shelter on the down side. The facilities were needed because the LMS ceased to use rail-motors on the passenger service switching to more conventional locomotives and coaches instead. It was probably at this time that the ‘Halt’ suffix was dropped from the station name, although OS maps continued to use it until it closed.

The LMS timetable for the summer of 1947 showed 11 trains in each direction on Monday-to-Friday. On Saturday there was an extra train in each direction but no trains called on Sunday.

On 1 January 1948 Ainsworth Road became part of British Railways (BR)London Midland Region (LMR). The summer 1949 timetable showed the same level of service as the last year of the LMS.

BR(LMR) closed Ainsworth Road station on 21 September 1953; it was demolished after closure.

The line continued to be used by freight trains and passenger diversions until it was closed completely on 2 November 1964.

The cutting was later filled in and houses were built on the site of the station.

Tickets from Michael Stewart and route map by Alan Young.

Sources:

  • A Regional History of the Railways of Great Britain - Volume 10 The North West - Geoffrey O Holt, David & Charles 1986.
  • Forgotten Railways - North West England - John Marshall, David & Charles 1981.
  • Lost Stations of North West England - Paul Wright, Silverlink Publishing 2011.
  • The Lancashire & Rorkshire Railway, Volume 1 - John Marshall, David & Charles 1969.
  • The Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Volume 2 - John Marshall, David & Charles 1970.

Click here to see the other stations between Bolton and Radcliffe:
Darcy Lever, Bradley Fold and Radcliffe


Ainsworth Road looking north-west in the summer of 1950.
Copyright p
hoto from Stations UK


Ainsworth Road Halt shown on a 25-inch scale map from 1927. At this time the halt had only short low level platforms. No shelters were provided.


By 1937 when this 25-inch scale map was drawn Ainsworth Road had been provided with higher and longer platforms. A waiting shelter had also been erected on the down platform.


The site of Ainsworth Road station looking south-east in May 1975.
P
hoto by John Mann

Looking north-west at the site of Ainsworth Road station in May 1975.
P
hoto by John Mann

A view looking south-east at the site of Ainsworth Road station on 28 August 2010.
P
hoto by Paul Wright


Looking north-west across Ainsworth Road on 28 august 2010. The remains of the bridge that had carried Ainsworth Road over the line can be seen in the middle distance. The station had been on the far side of the bridge where the red brick building can be seen.
P
hoto by Paul Wright

The bricked up entrance to the up platform at Ainsworth Road seen on 28 August 2010.
P
hoto by Paul Wright

 

 

 

[Source: Paul Wright]




Last updated: Saturday, 30-Sep-2017 12:53:44 BST
© 2004-2017 Disused Stations