Station Name: ALLHALLOWS-ON-SEA

[Source: Nick Catford]

Allhallows-on-Sea Station Gallery 2: 1950s - December 1961

The deserted platform at Allhallows-on-Sea station c1950s.
Photo from John Mann collection
Allhallows station entrance on Avery Way in the 1950s. Shortly after the station opened a tea room was built in front of the booking office, but it is already looking very run down. After closure it would be used as a night club for a few years.
Copyright photo from Tony Harden collect

In later years trains with more than two coaches were rarely seen at Alhallows. In this view from August 1955 quite a crowd have gathered on the other platform.
Copyright photo from by RM Casserley

H Class 0-4-4-T No.31322 is seen at Allhallows-on-Sea station on 9 July 1955 with the 1.42pm service to Gravesend. The South Eastern & Chatham Railway H Class was originally designed by Harry Wainwright in 1904 for suburban passenger work. Most of the 66 members of the class were later equipped for push-pull working for use on rural branch lines such as the Hundred of Hoo. No.31322 survived until 30 April 1961 when it was withdrawn from Tonbridge shed to be cut up at Ashford works two months later.
Photo by J H Aston

Concrete had previously been a favoured material for many Southern Railway running-in boards but both boards at Allhallows were plate glass held in a wooden frame, as seen in this example at the north end of the station in June 1956; perhaps it was intended to illuminate them. This type of board was also featured on the Wimbledon to Sutton line opened by the Southern Railway a few years earlier. A glass board has also been fitted at the restored station at Kingscote on the Bluebell Railway.
Photo by M Taylor

Allhallows goods shed was still standing circa mid 1950s but it had clearly been out of use for some time, with the entrance bricked up. It seems a lot larger than was ever likely to be required, and it is clear the Southern Railway anticipated substantial growth, which never happened.
Photo by G Gordon Watford

Allhallows-on-Sea station looking north towards the buffers circa late 1950s; an H Class 0-4-4-T bound for Gravesend is awaiting departure. The goods yard seen on the right was never very busy, and the large goods shed seen above has now been demolished, although the goods yard remained open until closure along with the passenger service in 1961. A few caravans are noted to the east of the station, within a few years the goods yard, and they would become part of the Kingsmead caravan park.
Photo from John Mann collection

Allhallows-on-Sea station circa late 1950s.
Photo from John Mann collection

The SR Q1 class is a austerity steam locomotive constructed during the Second World War. The class was designed by Oliver Bulleid for use on the intensive freight services experienced during wartime on the Southern Railway network. They were regularly seen hauling freight on the Hundred of Hoo branch thorough the 1950s. 33032 is seen at Allhallows station in August 1960. This locomotive was cut up at Eastleigh works in March 1964.
Copyright photo from Colour-Rail

An ex-South Eastern & Chatham Railway H Class 0-4-4T 31512 is seen at Allhallows with the Railway Enthusiasts Club's ‘North Kent Rail Tour’ on 24 September 1960. The South Eastern & Chatham Railway H Class was originally designed by Harry Wainwright in 1904 for suburban passenger work. Most of the 66 members of the class were later equipped for push-pull working for use on rural branch lines such as the Hundred of Hoo. No.31512 was withdrawn from Tonbridge shed a year later and cut up at Ashford works.
Photo by David Pearson

The Railway Enthusiasts’ Club's ‘North Kent Rail Tour’ is seen in the west platform on 24 September 1960. For some reason its headboard has been removed. Q1 No.33027 is seen in the siding having just hauled the 1.44pm Saturdays-only service consisting of one coach and a van from Gravesend. Its train is in the other platform with no obvious return journey in the timetable.
Photo by David Pearson


The unusual signal box at Allhallows, seen here in 1961, started life as a more traditional platform box with a pitched roof; this was removed when the canopy was extended in 1934. The height of the box was then raised with boards to the level of the underside of the canopy.

Looking south from the end of the platform at Allhallows in 1961. The turntable road is seen to the left.


Allhallows-on-Sea station on 2 December 1961, the penultimate day of public service.
Photo by John M Cramp from 30937 Transport Photograph Database

Click here for Allhallows-on-Sea Station
Gallery 3: December 1961 - 2005

 

 

 

[Source: Nick Catford]


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