Station Name: HOLME (Lancs)

[Source: Alan Young]

Holme Station Gallery 2: circa 1910 - October 2016

Holme (Lancs) station looking south-east circa 1910. The down (Burnley-bound) platform is to the right. The buildings on this platform were demolished in 1907 by a derailed goods train – an accident which cost the life of the deputy stationmaster. The site of the station building, destroyed in the accident, is immediately beyond the platform ramp on the nearside of the lamp post. The timber building which replaced it is beyond the second lamp post and appears to have a ‘General Room’ sign attached. The first and second lamp posts were installed after the accident. The replacement gents’ toilet is beyond, but not clearly visible. The platform levers in the foreground were probably installed when the station signal box closed in 1905 and it is thought that one released the wicket gate at the station entrance, seen far left. On the up platform the three timber buildings were not affected by the accident; the building closest to the camera houses the booking office. An LYR running-in nameboard is seen on the up platform.
Copyright photo from John Alsop collection

Holme (Lancs) station looking south-east circa 1910. The buildings on the down platform to the right have replaced those demolished by a derailed goods train in 1907. The corrugated iron store (right, foreground) is on the approximate site of the former station building. The timber structure beyond it replaced the station building and is of similar scale and appearance. On the opposite platform a railwayman is standing in front of the booking office, while the two other railwaymen have the waiting room block behind them, and the small building further along the platform is the gents’ toilet; these three buildings predate the accident of 1907 which affected only the down platform. In the distance the north-west portal of Holme Tunnel can be seen.
Copyright photo from Martin Bairstow and John Mann collections

On 1 January 1963 near Holme (Lancs) a Cravens (Class 105) 2-car DMU is working the 3.14pm Accrington to Todmorden service.
Photo by Ian G Holt

The site of Holme (Lancs) station looking south-east in February 1971. Nothing remains of the platforms or buildings, and a large scale OS map of 1960 suggests that demolition had already taken place. The 1953 One-inch OS map does not show the station, which had by then been closed to all traffic for over 20 years.
Photo by John Mann

The site of Holme (Lancs) station looking south-east in July 2016. There is little evidence on the photograph that a station ever stood here.
Photo by Alan Young

Looking south from the lane leading from Holme Chapel village to the former Holme (Lancs) station in July 2016. The gate is across the old path leading to the Burnley end of the station platforms, both of which have long been demolished. Beyond the red ‘Layby Closed’ sign to the left, the lane passes through a stone arch beneath the railway then under the bridge by which the Whitaker family of Holme Hall gained access to the down platform of the station.
Photo by Alan Young

Looking south-west in July 2016 up the path that formerly gave access to Holme (Lancs) station.
Photo by Alan Young

This lane provided access from Holme Chapel village to Holme (Lancs) station. It continued for a short distance beyond the station, passing under the two stone-arch bridges, as seen in this view looking north-east in July 2016. The distant stone arch carries the double-track Copy Pit railway route over the lane, and the nearer arch carried a footpath from Holme Hall providing its residents, the Whitaker family, with their own private access to the down (Burnley-bound) platform. Prior to crossing this bridge the footpath has passed underneath the railway.
Photo by Alan Young

The site of Holme (Lancs) station looking north-west in July 2016. The lane from Holme Chapel village passes obliquely under the railway in the foreground. The Whitaker family footbridge, seen on the previous image, is to the left of the photographer.
Photo by Ken Geddes

On 30 July 2016 a Class 158 DMU has emerged from the 265yd Holme Tunnel and is approaching the site of Holme (Lancs) station.
Photo by Ken Geddes

Restricted access to the site of Holme (Lancs) station’s down platform, looking north-east in July 2016. The lane from Holme Chapel village passes beneath the railway at the right-hand edge of this photograph – the stone wing-wall of the bridge is seen here  - about 75yd after its junction with the former public path to the station’s up platform, seen on an earlier image.
Photo by Ken Geddes

Holme Hall, also known as ‘Holme’ or ‘The Holme’, is the former residence of the Whitaker family who were provided with a private path and footbridge over the railway so that they could reach Holme station without encountering the hoi-polloi. The Grade II* Listed structure dates from the seventeenth century. After being used as a retirement home between 1985 and 2003 the empty building was badly damaged by fire in 2004, the cause of which was suspicious. It has recently been converted into ten ‘luxurious apartments’. The photograph was taken from the A646 on 4 October 2016.
Photo by Alan Young

Looking north-west on the A646 road on 4 October 2016, a hoarding advertises apartments for sale in what was the Whitakers’ residence. This family could reach Holme station by means of a private footpath. Holme station closed over 80 years ago, so occupants of the new stunning apartments are likely to drive to Burnley Manchester Road, with its recently expanded car park, if they wish
to catch a train.
Photo by Alan Young



 

 

 

[Source: Alan Young]




Last updated: Sunday, 21-May-2017 10:13:52 BST
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