Station Name: QUY

[Source: Darren Kitson]

Quy Station Gallery 2: 1969 - May 2015

A colour scene from 1969. An Austin 152 has been dumped alongside the station building; the Austin version of the better known Morris Commercial J2 or, simply, Morris J2. It has lost its headlights, at least, so presumably is no longer on the road - or at least not the public roads. The model was first introduced in 1956 and the example above appears to be registered SER 259; this was a Cambridgeshire registration issued in December 1957. Another vehicle, a car, has appeared at the other end of the station building but it is not known what it was. Clearly there was no entrance to the station building from the forecourt so, in the days when Quy had a ticket office, intending passengers had to enter the building from the platform. There is no evidence of the station ever having had an external ticket window. The building appears to have had wooden guttering; this was once very common and can still be seen today on a few older properties.
Photo by Tom Burnham from his Flickr photostream

Looking south-west at Quy station in the early 1970s. The trackbed has clearly seen
regular vehicular traffic.
Photo from John Mann collection
Another view from the early 1970s. The crumbling chimneystack has seen better days and the station building is looking more dilapidated. It must be a pleasant day as the bedroom window of the former stationmaster's house is open. With the removal of track and ballast, the platforms of disused stations become rather deeper as more of the face is exposed. Standard height from rail level on British railways is 3ft and the drop, above, without track and ballast will be more like 4ft 6ins.
Photo from John Mann collection
The forecourt side of the station building in the early 1970s where things are looking rather more ramshackle than in a similar view above which was taken a couple of years earlier. The roof, chimneystacks and flashing all appear to be in good condition, however.
Photo from John Mann collection
Again in the early 1970s the station building is looking shabby and with three of the windows boarded from the inside, but is nevertheless quite intact. The gas cylinders and other items on the platform suggest that the building is in use as some sort of workshop or, more likely, given the boarded-up windows, a store. The dark patch between the two nearest windows is where an oil lamp was once mounted (see earlier images)
Photo from John Mann collection

On another early 1970s view this is the forecourt side of the station building and a scene of utter despair. Even the roof is now showing signs of disrepair. As mentioned earlier, the purpose of the small building in the foreground is not clear. On plans it is simply marked as part of the station building. A slightly better view of the former stationmaster's house is afforded this time.
Photo from John Mann collection

The platform side of the station building in May 1976. Colour photography is more revealing, and here we can see not only the mark left on the wall by the oil lamp but also where noticeboards were once fixed between the windows. Further along the platform, the cream-painted GER fencing is still standing. One of the chimneystacks is beginning to crumble by this time.
Photo by David Burrows from his Flickr photostream

The scene in May 1977. Despite the influx of nature and the dilapidation, the station remains recognisable. Compare this with earlier views taken when the line was still open. The use of the trackbed by road or farm vehicles has prevented undergrowth from encroaching upon the platform and hiding it from view.
Photo by Alan Young

Looking north-west along the platform at Quy station in May 2015. The original station building has been extended in both directions and the weatherboarding, windows and doors have all been replaced.
Photo by Nick Catford

Quy station looking south-east towards the Station Road level crossing in May 2015.
Photo by Nick Catford

Quy station forecourt in May 2015. Marks on the roof clearly show the size of the extension. Note the replica totem sign on the wall.
Photo by Nick Catford

Recent aerial view showing Quy station. Station Road runs across the bottom left corner. The level crossing is seen on the left. The gate keeper’s cottage is at the junction with the station approach road. The extended station building is on the right with the stationmaster's house between the station and Station Road.



 

 

 

[Source: Darren Kitson]




Last updated: Friday, 12-May-2017 18:09:53 BST
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