[Source: Nick Catford and Brian Hart]



Sandling Junction Gallery 2: August 1950 - May 2014


No.31521 with autotrain No.721 await the 'all clear' before proceeding onto the main line with a through service for Ashford on 25 August 1951. 31521 was built at Ashford works to a design by Wainwright. Entering service during August 1909, this 0-4-4 tank had a working life of well over 52 years and was withdrawn on 19 May 1962 and scrapped a month later. The down branch siding is seen on the right running behind the down platform. The timber roader shed is seen on the far left. This kind of shed was provided by the SER at stations that had insufficient goods traffic to warrant a proper goods shed.
Photo by RC Riley

An up express thunders through Sandling Junction station on 25 August 1951 whilst a Hythe branch train, bound for Ashford, waits in the branch platform for the express to clear the junction.
Photo by RC Riley

The station forecourt on the up branch platform in 1957. Although the Hythe branch closed in 1951 the ticket office remained open into the 1960s.
Photo by AE Bennett

Sandling for Hythe station looking east circa early 1960s. The Hythe branch was closed by this date, but the junction was still in use for access to the goods yard which remained open until 1963.
Photo from John Mann collection

Looking south-east at Sandling Junction from the down main line approach road circa early 1960s. This vantage point was used by many railway photographers over the years. Note the passenger walkway from the up branch ticket office, which was still open, over the barrow crossing at the north end of the platform. Two former Pullman coaches have been stabled in the down siding since 1960 for use as camping coaches.
Photo from John Mann collection

Sandling for Hythe station in the early 1960s. The shelter on the former branch down platform was not part of the original station but was quickly added to provide protection from the weather. One of the camping coaches is seen on the right; this was fitted with a full kitchen, two sleeping compartments and a room with two single beds.
Photo from John Mann collection

Looking south-east along the down branch platform in the early 1960s. Although the Hythe branch had been closed for at least ten years the ticket office on the up branch platform remained open, with a walkway across the branch line to reach the main line platforms.
Photo from John Mann collection

Looking north-west at Sandling goods yard and the disused branch platforms in May 1965. The yard closed on 4 February 1963 and the up sidings appear recently lifted. The platform road has been retained as a refuge siding and as a headshunt for the down siding where two camping coaches are still stabled. At this time all the branch station buildings were still standing.
Photo by Keith Harwood

Looking north-west at the down branch platform in May 1975. The down siding has now been lifted and all the branch buildings have been demolished. Only the down platform road remains as a refuge siding. The rails appear rusty so the siding would appear to be rarely used; it remained for a further 15 years, however. The up goods yard and station forecourt are now used as the station car park.
Photo by Nick Catford

Looking north-west towards Sandling Junction station from the end of the line in May 1975.
Photo by Nick Catford

Probably more people than Sandling platform has ever seen before or since; on the left passengers disembark from the 'Tunnel Explorer' excursion, and on the right 319008 arrives with one of the trips back from the Channel Tunnel on 7 May 1994. On 10 December 1993 319008 travelled through the Channel Tunnel to Calais-Fréthun and back with a party of invited guests, after the construction consortium TransManche Link had transferred responsibility for operations and management over to Eurotunnel. Their pantographs were modified at Selhurst Depot beforehand to account for the higher OHL height at Cheriton and in the tunnel. For the subsequent 'Folkestone 1994' event on 7 May 1994, which saw the first paying members of the public taken into the tunnel by train on 26 March 1994, unit 319008 and 319009 was named 'Cheriton' at Victoria and a plaque adorned with the Union Flag and Tricolore was installed in the first motor carriage.
Photo from the 74009 Flickr photostream

Looking south-east along the branch down platform in April 2014. A pedestrian walkway from the station car park along the trackbed leads passengers to the end of the platform where they walk up the ramp to reach the station building on the up side of the main line.
Photo by Nick Catford

Looking north-west along the down branch platform in April 1914. The area enclosed by the fence is still in use for passengers reaching Sandling station. The remaining part of the platform is the start of a public footpath that follows the trackbed to the north portal of Hayne Wood tunnel.
Photo by Nick Catford

Looking north-west along the overground trackbed towards Sandling Junction. The degraded down platform, now without its edging, is seen on the right.
Photo by Nick Catford

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[Source: Nick Catford and Brian Hart]



Last updated: Friday, 26-May-2017 09:51:46 BST
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