Station Name: SIX MILE BOTTOM


[Source: Nick Catford]


Six Mile Bottom Station Gallery 2:
October 1969 - October 2014


Six Mile Bottom station in October 1969. The goods yard closed on 13 July 1964, 2½ years before the passenger service was withdrawn. The rail entrance into the goods shed has been boarded up and the rails of the siding embedded in London Road appear to have been removed
Photo by Nick Catford

The main station building at Six Mile Bottom station in July 1971. Apart from the removal of station signs little has changed since closure. The building was further altered during the BR period although no changes are obvious in this view.
Photo by John Mann

Six Mile Bottom station looking north-east from the London Road level crossing in May 1971.
Photo by John Mann

Six Mile Bottom station and signal box seen from an approaching eastbound DMU in May 1973
Photo by Alan Young

Six Mile Bottom station seen from the signal box in 1975. The level crossing gates have been replaced with lifting barriers and both platform ramps have been demolished. Behind the down platform new doors have been fitted to the goods shed, and the building is now used as a depot for
waste paper (AJ Thompson).
Photo by David Burrows from his Flickr photostream

The Saxby & Farmer signal box at Six Mile Bottom station in 1965, one hundred years after it was built. The box would survive for another ten years and was finally closed when the line was
singled and re-signalled.
Photo by David Burrows from his Flickr photostream

A Class 31 (Brush Type 2) hauls the midday Cambridge - Ipswich service through Six Mile Bottom station on a wet day in November 1975. It was normally a DMU but when Ipswich Town was playing at home it was loco-hauled.
Photo by David Burrows from his Flickr photostream

Six Mile Bottom station looking north-east along the up platform in November 1975. The two truncated platform ends are clearly seen.
Photo by David Burrows from his Flickr photostream

A hybrid DMU with a Cambridge service passes through Six Mile Bottom station in November 1975. The leading car is a Gloucester RC&W Class 100 driving trailer and the rear car is a Cravens Class 105 driving motor. The sticker in the top of the central windscreen indicated that it is a Norwich-based unit. Some Class 100s were transferred to East Anglia from the late 1960s onwards as part of the scheme to replace the 79xxx Derby Lightweight and Met-Camm units.
Photo by David Burrows from his Flickr photostream

Looking south-west along the up platform at Six Mile Bottom station in November 1975. The boarded-up gents' toilet is seen at the end of the building.
Photo by David Burrows from his Flickr photostream

Looking north-east towards Six Mile Bottom station in October 1983 during lifting of the redundant down track. The signal box closed on 8 May that year following resignalling of the line. The cattle dock is seen on the right.
Photo by Martin Potter

Six Mile Bottom station looking north-east from the London Road crossing in October 2014. The line has been singled. On the up platform the canopy has been removed and on the down platform the shelter has been demolished. The goods shed at the rear of the platform has also been demolished and new housing (Ardross Court) has been built on the site.
Photo by Nick Catford

Six Mile Bottom station building in October 2014. It is quite clear from this view that the building has been extended several times. The way out through the booking office has been bricked up - to the right of the two-storey section. The house was sold for £249,995 in March 2014. Click here to see a series of pictures inside the house
Photo by Nick Catford.

Click here for more pictures of Six Mile Bottom station


 

 

 

[Source: Nick Catford]




Last updated: Saturday, 31-Dec-2016 12:37:12 GMT
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