Station Name: HEBDEN BRIDGE
Station still open but included for completeness

[Source: Alan Young]

Hebden Bridge Gallery 2: Early 1960s - July 1980

Hebden Bridge station’s goods warehouse looking north-west from the up platform circa early 1960s. The siding on the near side of the warehouse has been lifted but the redundant buffer stop is still in place. The warehouse consists of two ‘bays’, the right hand section being added to the existing building in 1884. Goods traffic ceased to be handled at Hebden Bridge in May 1966 and the warehouse would be damaged by fire then demolished in 1969, making way for the station car park.
Photo from John Mann collection and Pennine Horizons Digital Archive

On 11 April 1966 a Bradford Exchange to Southport holiday extra is approaching Hebden Bridge station. Hauling the train is ‘Black Five’ Stanier-designed 4-6-0 No.45096. Built at Vulcan Foundry, Newton-le-Willows in April 1935 the loco carried LMS number 5096. She survived until the end of steam on British Rail, being withdrawn in August 1968 from 24B, Rose Grove shed. In December 1968 she was disposed of by T W Ward, Beighton, Sheffield.
Photo by Ian G Holt

On 30 July 1966 the Blackpool North to Leeds Central train has arrived at Hebden Bridge. The recently-closed goods warehouse is seen beyond the passenger station. The engine is Stanier-designed ‘Jubilee’ 4-6-0 No.45565 ‘Victoria’, built in October 1934 at the North British Locomotive Company works, Glasgow. She would be withdrawn on 6 January 1967 from 25F, Low Moor shed, to be cut up the following July by Draper, Neptune Street Goods Yard, Hull.
Photo by Ian G Holt

On 30 July 1966 the Blackpool North to Leeds Central train is leaving Hebden Bridge at 15.12, if it is running on time. The engine is Stanier-designed ‘Jubilee’ 4-6-0 No.45565 ‘Victoria’, built in October 1934 at the North British Locomotive Company works, Glasgow. She would be withdrawn on 6 January 1967 from 25F, Low Moor shed, to be cut up the following July by Draper, Neptune Street Goods Yard, Hull.
Photo by Ian G Holt

The goods warehouse at Hebden Bridge is seen in 1967, looking south-east in the year after it closed. Most of the tracks are in place but there is an air of neglect. Features of interest include the tall gas lamp in the foreground, the loading gauge above the right hand entrance, now closed up and with its track lifted, and the lucam (shelter over a hoist) projecting from the wall (right). In 1969 the warehouse would be damaged by fire and demolished, providing space for the station car park.
Photo from John Mann collection and Pennine Horizons Digital Archive

The down (Leeds-bound) platform of Hebden Bridge station in 1969. The station remains very much as built in 1891/92. The main facilities are on this platform. The timber structure from which wheels protrude at the top is the hydraulic lift, providing access to the subway, which is otherwise accessible only by a staircase from the platform; the up platform is connected to the subway via a ramp.
Photo from Jim Lake collection

Looking north-west beneath the glazed roofing on the down platform of Hebden Bridge c1970. Much interesting detail can be seen, including the LMS ‘Hawkseye’ nameboard on the extreme right and a generous supply of Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway signs. The station is still gas-lit. Various oil drums and trolleys are scattered around.

In 1973 Mrs Blakey, the porter, is either lighting or extinguishing the gas lamps on the down platform of Hebden Bridge station; electric lighting would be installed by summer 1974. The lamps are of the Sugg ‘Rochester’ design, the product of William Sugg & Co; these are still available and are installed where a ‘heritage’ image is required, though usually electrically lit. By 1991 such lamps were to be reinstated at Hebden Bridge. Remarkably, the station has retained its Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway signage, seen here repainted in British Railways North Eastern Region tangerine. In the background is the lift which supplemented the subway stairs. Intended originally for parcels and sundries it was taken out of use during the 1980s (and wrangling over reinstatement to provide step-free access is ongoing in 2016). A further point of interest is the decorative canopy spandrels with their wheel decoration. Similar, but not identical, designs can still be seen elsewhere such as at Poulton-le-Fylde.
Photo from Lloyd Greenwood collection and Pennine Horizons Digital Archive

Hebden Bridge station’s down platform seen from a passing train on 20 August 1974. Although BR (Eastern Region) has recently installed electric strip lighting and ‘Corporate Identity’ nameplates, uncharacteristic restraint has left the LYR running-in nameboard and other signage in place, still in BR(NE) colours. One of the BR(E) huge lamp standards which dominated so many of their stations from the early 1970s can be seen beyond the canopy.
Photo by Alan Young

The down platform at Hebden Bridge, looking south-east under the glazed roofing on 3 June 1978, as a DMU calls en route to Halifax. British Rail has kindly left the LYR signs in place but could not resist the urge to repaint them in ‘Corporate Identity’ black and white to complement their bland modern image nameplates, one of which is in the foreground. The traditional atmosphere is enhanced by the two trolleys in front of the nameboard.
Photo by Alan Young

On 22 July 1980 a Class 110 DMU approaches the down platform at Hebden Bridge. The station has now been recognised as worthy of special treatment. Not only have the LYR signs been repainted in the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway’s chocolate and white, but British Rail has loosened its normally inflexible ‘Corporate Identity’ policy and replaced the black and white nameplates with unique brown and white specimens. ‘Railway Magazine’ (January 1981) reported that the Chairman of Calder Civic Trust had presented the BR Area Manager with a commemorative plaque as a token of thanks.
Photo by Alan Young

A wonderful array of Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway signs on the down platform of Hebden Bridge station in July 1980. The two trolleys have exchanged places since the June 1978 photograph.
Photo by Alan Young

Click here for Hebden Bridge Gallery 3:
July 1980 - August 2009

 

 

 

[Source: Alan Young]




Last updated: Sunday, 21-May-2017 10:07:08 BST
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