Station Name: KILLINGWORTH

[Source: Alan Young]

Killingworth Station Gallery 2: September 1957 - May 1968

In September 1957 Class D20/1 No.62395 heads a local passenger train southbound through Killingworth station. The waiting shed, seen on the up platform, was constructed by the Newcastle & Berwick railway and given its timber-and-glass front by the NER. The tall NER signal box was opened in 1899. The standard style of NER footbridge had two staircases at each end enabling passengers to move safely between the platforms and for pedestrians on Station Road to cross the line when a train was expected and the gates were closed. The 4-4-0 loco was designed by Worsdell and built in June 1907 at the NER’s Gateshead works. It was withdrawn from 52D, Tweedmouth shed, in November 1957 and cut up in February 1958 at British Railways’ Darlington works, North Road.
Photo by Les Turnbull


In September 1957 Class D20/1 No.62396 heads a local passenger train from Alnwick southbound into Killingworth station. The ticket collector can be seen in the far right of the photograph. The waiting shed, seen on the up platform, was constructed by the Newcastle & Berwick railway and given its timber-and-glass front by the NER. The 4-4-0 loco was designed by Worsdell and built in September 1907 at the NER’s Gateshead works. It was withdrawn from 52D, Tweedmouth shed, in December 1957 and cut up later that month at British Railways’ Darlington works, North Road.
Photo by Les Turnbull

In 1957 there is brisk business at the Racecourse platform, with two trains calling. Until 1881 horse racing in Newcastle took place close to Grandstand Road on the city’s Town Moor (served by Moor Edge station on the line between Jesmond and Gosforth) but in that year the races were moved to Gosforth Park, and Killingworth became the railhead for horse-boxes and visitors to the races. To deal with this traffic some sidings were added, with an island and flanking platform for passengers who arrived and departed by special trains. In this view J39 No.64919 can be seen. This Gresley-designed 0-6-0 was built in October 1936 by Beyer Peacock at Gorton and withdrawn from 25F, Low Moor shed, on 3 December 1962; it was cut up at British Railways’ Darlington works, North Road, in June 1963.
Photo by Ken Potts


A general view of Killingworth station, looking south-east from the ramp of the up platform in 1958. The station closed to passengers that year, and it is not known whether this view pre-dates or post-dates closure. The station is still in good order with its garden tidily maintained. In the distance Killingworth Sidings signal box can be seen, as can the signal gantries associated with the sidings. A rake of trucks is parked in the sidings.
Copyright photo from Stations UK


Looking south from Killingworth station c1959, on the right can be seen Killingworth Sidings signal box and the appropriately named ‘George Stephenson Inn’ on Great Lime Road. The signal gantry controlled access to and from the racecourse sidings behind the photographer.
Photo from David Dunn collection


Looking north-west towards Killingworth station on 2 January 1959. The down platform of the recently closed main line passenger station can be seen on the right with the sidings for racecourse traffic behind it, occupied by some wagons and brake vans. The gantry with its panoply of signals to control access to the sidings, and modest number to control egress, will be noted. Houses in Northfield Drive, on the extreme left, are under construction.
Photo by Chris Campbell

In July 1961 Gresley-designed A4 Pacific No.60002 ‘Sir Murrough Wilson’ hauls a rake of box vans southwards past Killingworth station signal box. These locos were designed for more noble duties, and at one time were kept spotlessly clean: the photographer comments, ‘how the mighty have fallen in the latter days of steam!’. The 4-6-2 locomotive was built at the LNER’s Doncaster works in April 1938 and initially carried the number 4499. It was withdrawn on 4 May 1964 from 52A, Gateshead shed, and cut up by Cohens of Cargo Fleet in the following July. Other features of interest are the North Eastern Railway sign warning trespassers that they may be liable to a fine ‘not exceeding forty shillings’ (£2.00) – equivalent in 1912 to a first class return fare between Berwick and York; and the telegraph poles lining the track, which were a familiar feature of railway routes until the 1980s; now only the Inverness-Aberdeen route retains them.
Photo by Chris Morgan


An unidentified English Electric 1Co-Co1 (later Class 40) hauls an express southbound past the tall Killingworth station signal box in June 1962. The photograph was taken from the footbridge, and the disused station is behind the photographer. The trackwork giving access to Weetslade Colliery exchange sidings can be seen in the distance.
Photo by Chris Morgan


Southbound A3 No.60103 ‘Flying Scotsman’ at Killingworth level crossing on a special train in 1968 – the year in which steam haulage ceased on the British Rail standard gauge lines. The date was possibly 1 May, when the 40th anniversary of the ‘Flying Scotsman’s non-stop run from London Kings Cross to Edinburgh Waverley was being celebrated; this would be the return run of the train. In 1968 there were still water troughs on the East Coast main line to allow non-stop runs by steam engines. This 4-6-2 was designed by Gresley and built in the GNR/LNER Doncaster works in February 1923. The loco was initially numbered 1472 by the GNR, under whose auspices its construction began, and it later carried the LNER number 4472. This was the first steam locomotive to be officially authenticated at reaching 100mph (on 30 November 1934). On 15 January 1963 it was withdrawn from 34A, Kings Cross shed, but was destined for preservation. ‘Flying Scotsman’ set a further record on 8 August 1989 in Australia, this time for the longest non-stop run (422 miles) by a steam locomotive. It is now one of the prized exhibits at the National Railway Museum in York. On this special occasion in 1968 the train is attracting attention. In the ‘United’ Bristol LS single-decker the conductor is standing next to the driver to watch the approaching train. Over 300 buses of this type were operated by ‘United’ from the early
1950s into the 1970s.
Photo by Chris Morgan


A Class 55 ‘Deltic’ is heading a northbound train through the disused Killingworth station, possibly on 1 May 1968. The photographer thinks that it is most likely to be D9002 (later 55 002) ‘The King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry’. At the time coaches were being repainted in ‘rail’ blue and white, but the third one retains the earlier maroon livery.
Photo by Chris Morgan

Click here for Killingworth Station Gallery 3:
c1968 - June 2013



 

 

 

[Source: Alan Young]




Last updated: Sunday, 21-May-2017 08:58:54 BST
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