Station Name: PADSTOW

[Source: Martin James]

Padstow Gallery 12: January 2000 - May 2016

By January 2000 little has changed from the 1975 view above. Cars are still parked in front of the platform although echelon parking in marked bays is now required.
Photo by Martin James

Padstow station building in January 2000, now in use as council offices for Padstow Town Council. The former gents’ toilet at the end of the building has lost its sloping roof and is now a public toilet, ladies' and gents'.
Photo by Martin James

Padstow station forecourt in 2000. The sign on the building states 'Padstow Town Council'. The booking office door appears to be permanently blocked as the booking office and adjacent waiting room are now used as the council chamber.
Photo by Martin James

Padstow Fish Shed in January 2000. The original shed (left) and the 1912 extension are seen. Within a few months the building would be demolished.
Photo by Martin James


Looking south along the station platform in December 2012. The large blue building in the distance is A&J Marine boat builders and repair yard. The smaller building to its left is Padstow Cycle Hire.
Photo by Chris Fletcher

Padstow stationmaster's house in December 2012. Padstow Town Council moved out three months earlier owing to high levels of radon gas and electrical problems. The public toilets still appear to be open; clearly the radon was not considered a problem for short-term visitors.
Photo by Chris Fletcher

Padstow station looking north from the south end of the platform in December 2012. That end of the platform was demolished c1976.
Photo by Chris Fletcher

Padstow station building in May 2016. Refurbishment of the building started in January 2016 and the platform is fenced off in front of the building while work is being carried out. The truncated platform is clearly seen. The orange building is a café.
Photo by D Carson

Work on Little Petherick Creek bridge got underway in December 1896 with the erection of temporary staging over Little Petherick Creek, a mile south-east of Padstow. This facilitated construction of a bridge comprising three spans of 133ft each, curving to the north on a radius of about 20 chains. It was built by contractors from Derby, Messrs Eastwood Swingler & Co. The spans are formed of two Pratt trusses, together with nine cross girders and three wind braces, giving a deck width of 16ft 3 in. Two rail bearers are also provided. The ironwork was brought by rail to Wadebridge before being carried on barges to site down the River Camel. Each truss weighs 350 tons. The main bridge's abutments are formed in brick and concrete. Supporting the spans are two piers incorporating pairs of cast iron cylinders, 8ft in diameter and at 18ft 3in centres. These are braced at the top. Rail level is approximately 85ft above bedrock, 30ft above the river bed and 16ft above high water level. At the top of the cylinders are granite bedstones and cast iron bearings. The trackbed over the bridge now forms part of the 18-mile Camel Trail, which attracts around 350,000 users annually. Initially a narrow wooden walkway accommodated the path, but the bridge has since been refurbished and a
full-width deck installed.

 

 

 

[Source: Martin James]



Last updated: Monday, 22-May-2017 10:42:51 BST
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