Station Name: SHAWCLOUGH & HEALEY

[Source: Alan Young]

Shawclough & Healey Station Gallery 2:
21 July 1962 - February 2016


On 21 July 1962, a week before the ‘Salford Hundred Rail Tour’ visited the Facit Branch, No.43909 stands with the Saturday goods train at Shawclough & Healey station. The passenger platform has been colonised by weeds following the withdrawal of passenger services in 1947 but the goods yard remains open and the station building is used by the stationmaster/goods agent who also supervises Whitworth and Facit stations. The loco was built in April 1920 at the Midland Railway’s Derby works. She was withdrawn from 16C, Kirkby-in-Ashfield shed, on 9 May 1964 and cut up in December 1964 by the Slag Reduction Co Ltd, Ickles, Rotherham.
Photo from Bob Hayter collection


Looking north at the northern end of the goods yard at Shawclough & Healey c1962, with what is probably No.45150, a Stanier ‘Black Five’  based at 13A, Trafford Park shed.  The timber cabin is provided to house the 3-lever ground frame. Although the station’s goods yard closed in 1964 the sidings serving Turner Bros works were officially in use until the Facit Branch closed to all traffic in August 1967. The last time this ground frame was used was 2 January 1967.
Photo by Richard S Greenwood


Looking south-east at Shawclough & Healey station on 19 February 1967 on the occasion of the LCGB and Roch Valley Railway Society ‘L&Y Pug Rail Tour’ which visited the surviving section of the Rochdale–Bacup line whose terminus from 1963–67 was Whitworth. Photo-stops were made at Wardleworth and, here, at Shawclough & Healey.  Although passenger trains were discontinued in 1947 the station building remained in use until January 1964 as the goods office where the stationmaster / goods agent for Shawclough, Whitworth and (until 1963) Facit was based.  In the days when this railtour took place there were no ‘health and safety’ qualms about allowing the passengers to use the abandoned platform or even stroll around on the tracks. Goods were handled in the station’s sidings until 1964, and three years later the goods warehouse, in the background, is still in place. The locomotive, No.51218 is an Aspinall 0-4-0 saddle tank, fondly known as a ‘Pug’. She was built at the LYR Horwich works in October 1901 and as a LYR Class 21 first carried the number 68, being re-numbered 11218 in LMS days. On 30 September 1964 she was withdrawn from 87A, Neath Court Sart shed, and was purchased by the L&Y Saddletanks Fund and housed on the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway. The Saddletanks Fund later became the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Preservation Society, and more recently the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Trust, which now owns 51218.Three round trips in four brake vans trips were made on the tour between Rochdale and Whitworth, the northern terminus of the line.
Photo by Ian G Holt


Looking south-west at Shawclough & Healey station on 19 February 1967. The LCGB and Roch Valley Railway Society ‘L&Y Pug Rail Tour’ is making a photo-stop at the disused station, and in days when ‘health and safety’ did not impose onerous restrictions the passengers have alighted onto the platform and are strolling around on the trackbed. The low pitched roof of the disused passenger building (latterly the goods office) is visible behind the brake vans; the taller roof beyond it is part of Turner’s Asbestos works. Three round trips in four brake vans trips were made on the tour between Rochdale and Whitworth, the northern terminus of the Facit Branch from 1963 until 1967 when the entire line closed.
Photo by Ian G Holt

The Locomotive Club of Great Britain and Roch Valley Railway Society organised the ‘L&Y Pug Rail Tour’ on 19 February 1967 to visit the surviving section of the Rochdale–Bacup line. Photo-stops were made at Wardleworth and, here, at Shawclough & Healey. Three round trips in four brake vans trips were made on the tour between Rochdale and Whitworth – the terminus of the line. Departures from Rochdale were timed to run at 10.00am, 12.30pm and 2pm taking 40 minutes to complete the journey to Whitworth (including the photo stops). There was a 50 minute stopover at Whitworth..
Photo by Ian G Holt


Another view of the LCGB and Roch Valley Railway Society organised the ‘L&Y Pug Rail Tour’ at Shawclough & Healey station on 19 February 1967.
Photo by David Pearson

Looking south-east at Shawclough & Healey station on 19 February 1967 as the LCGB and Roch Valley Railway Society ‘L&Y Pug Rail Tour’ which visited the surviving section of the Rochdale–Bacup line pulls out of the station. Goods were handled in the station’s sidings until 1964, and three years later the goods warehouse, in the background, is still in place.
Photo by Ian G Holt


Looking south-east at Healey & Shawclough station in November 1970. The rails have been removed since the line was abandoned in 1967 but ballast is still in place on the trackbed of the former main line. The area to the left was formerly occupied by goods loop lines. Although the passenger facilities had been out of use since 1947, a railtour called here in 1967 when both the platform and the station building were in place; the building has since been demolished.
Photo by John Mann

Looking south-east along Dell Road in January 2012. The stone wall on the left was at the back of the passenger station and short siding of Shawclough & Healey, of which no traces remain. A residential development called Columbine Close, a cul-de-sac off Campion Way, occupies the site.
Photo by Bob Hayter


Looking north across Dell Road towards Harridge Bank (formerly Station Cottages) and the site of Shawclough & Healey station in June 2015. The station and goods yard were located beyond the trees where the modern houses can be seen. The trees are growing on the railway embankment (left).  The railway crossed Dell Road immediately left of the photo, but the bridge and its abutments have been demolished.
Photo by Alan Young

Looking south-east towards Campion Way in February 2016 along the route of the former Rochdale to Bacup railway. Shawclough & Healey station site is ahead of the camera.  At approximately the point from which the photo is taken Harridge Siding diverged to serve the eponymous asbestos factory. The site of the station’s goods yard is the left of this view.
Photo by Alan Young


Looking north-west towards the site of the passenger station of Shawclough & Healey in February 2016. It is long demolished and Columbine Close has been built in its place.
Photo by Alan Young


 

 

 

[Source: Alan Young]




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