Station Name: SEEDLEY

[Source: Bevan Price & Paul Wright]



Date opened: 1.5.1882
Location: On the west side of Langworthy Road (A5186)
Company on opening: London & North Western Railway
Date closed to passengers: 2.1.1956
Date closed completely: 2.1.1956
Company on closing: British Railways (London Midland Region)
Present state: Demolished
County: Lancashire
OS Grid Ref: SJ804983
Date of visit: 2003

Notes: Seedley station was located on the Liverpool & Manchester Railway (L&M), the world’s first purpose-built passenger railway that linked two major centres of population. It has been called the earliest ‘Inter-City’ railway. The line opened to public services on 16 September 1830 and was an immediate success. On 8 August 1845 the L&M merged with the Grand Junction Railway which a year later on 16 July1846 became part of the London & North Western Railway (LNWR).

By the 1880s the former L&M route had been quadrupled between Patricroft and Manchester Exchange and there had been westward-spreading urban development in what is now known as the City of Salford. To cater for the development around Seedley a station was opened by the LNWR on 1 May 1882.

The station was located on the west side of Langworthy Road which passed over the railway on a bridge. The main entrance was at street level on the north side of the line. It consisted of a neat timber building with a hipped roof and two tall square chimneystacks at each end, set at 45deg to the building. The entrance was sheltered by an awning consisting of three pitches, its gables at right-angles to the façade.

Covered steps and a footbridge connected three platforms to the entrance building. One of the platforms was an island with two faces which enabled all four tracks to be served.

On each platform there were passenger facilities including waiting rooms and toilets. They were housed in austere timber buildings, but flats awnings of generous dimensions stretched to the platform edges and were finished off with modest serrated valances.

Seedley was not provided with goods facilities.

The December 1895 timetable showed thirty-eight up and thirty-seven down trains Monday-to-Saturday as seen in the table below. At peak times was a very intensive train service. There was an extra down train on Mondays and the station was even well served on Sundays.

Up Trains December 1895 Destination Down Trains December 1895 Destination
5.29am Manchester Exchange 5.34am Patricroft
6.24am Manchester Exchange 6.05am (Mondays Only) Rainhill
6.55am Manchester Exchange 6.10am Warrington Bank Quay
7.09am Manchester Exchange 6.55am Bolton
7.22am Manchester Exchange 7.30am Wigan
7.38am Manchester Exchange 7.55am Patricroft
7.54am Manchester Exchange 8.12am Bolton
8.09am Manchester Exchange 8.25am Wigan
8.12am Manchester Exchange 8.59am Patricroft
8.32am Manchester Exchange 10.17am Patricroft
8.59am Manchester Exchange 10.39am Bolton
9.34am Manchester Exchange 11.40am Patricroft
9.52am Manchester Exchange 12.10pm Patricroft
10.39am Manchester Exchange 12.30pm Bolton
11.12am Manchester Exchange 1.16pm (Saturdays Excepted) Patricroft
11.55am Manchester Exchange 1.21pm (Saturdays Only ) Kenyon Junction
12.17pm Manchester Exchange 1.35pm Patricroft
12.30pm Manchester Exchange 1.51pm Bolton
12.58pm Manchester Exchange 2.08pm Patricroft
1.39pm (Saturdays Only ) Manchester Exchange 3.00pm Newton-le-Willows
1.47pm Manchester Exchange 3.22pm Bolton
1.51pm Manchester Exchange 3.45pm Patricroft
1.54pm (Saturdays Excepted) Manchester Exchange 4.26pm Wigan
2.09pm Manchester Exchange 4.55pm Patricroft
3.14pm Manchester Exchange 5.26pm Tyldesley
3.22pm Manchester Exchange 5.59pm Patricroft
4.19pm Manchester Exchange 6.22pm Patricroft
4.26pm Manchester Exchange 6.29pm Wigan
4.56pm Manchester Exchange 6.55pm Bolton
5.59pm Manchester Exchange 7.20pm Liverpool Lime Street
6.39pm Manchester Exchange 7.40pm Wigan
6.55pm Manchester Exchange 8.20pm Tyldesley
7.29pm Manchester Exchange 8.40pm Newton-le-Willows
7.37pm Manchester Exchange 8.55pm Bolton
8.34pm Manchester Exchange 9.24pm Wigan
8.55pm Manchester Exchange 9.55pm Patricroft
9.11pm Manchester Exchange 10.25pm Patricroft
9.54pm Manchester Exchange 10.55pm Patricroft
10.54pm Manchester Exchange 11.25pm Patricroft

The July 1922 timetable showed Seedley as having a reduced service of twenty-one up and twenty -four down trains Monday-to-Friday. On Saturdays there were nineteen up and twenty-two down trains. No trains called on Sundays.

On 1 January 1923 Seedley became part of the London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS). The LMS provided a similar level of service to the LNWR with the same destinations being served.

With the outbreak of the Second World War on 3 September 1939 timetables were altered and services reduced. Even after the war had ceased passenger services at Seedley did not return to the 1930s levels. The LMS timetable for 1947 showed ten up and five down services on Monday-to-Friday with concentrations around the peak hours as seen in the table below. On Saturday there was one fewer down train but the middle part of the day was better served. No trains called at Seedley on Sunday.

Up Trains Summer 1947

Destination

Down Trains Summer 1947

Destination

6.57am

Manchester Exchange

7.40am

Eccles

7.33am

Manchester Exchange

9.29am (Saturdays Only)

Eccles

7.52am

Manchester Exchange

12.15pm (Saturdays Only)

Eccles

8.04am

Manchester Exchange

12.55pm (Saturdays Only)

Eccles

8.20am

Manchester Exchange

4.29pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Eccles

8.36am

Manchester Exchange

5.33pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Eccles

12.17pm (Saturdays Only)

Manchester Exchange

5.48pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Eccles

1.00pm (Saturdays Only)

Manchester Exchange

6.18pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Eccles

2.18pm (Saturdays Only)

Manchester Exchange

5.02pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Manchester Exchange

5.14pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Manchester Exchange

5.50pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Manchester Exchange

6.14pm (Saturdays Excepted)

Manchester Exchange

On 1 January 1948 Seedley became part of British Railways [London Midland Region] (BR[LMR]). The BR[LMR] summer timetable for 1953 showed ten up and five down services Monday-to-Friday. On Saturdays there were nine up and five down trains.

With such a poor level of service Seedley was proposed for closure and all services were withdrawn from 2 January 1956. The station was demolished shortly after. Only sections of retaining wall on the south side of the line remained to show where the station had been.

In the late 1970s the line through Seedley was reduced to a double-track railway and in the early 1980s the M602 motorway was constructed in parallel to the railway on its north side. The motorway used land that had previously been part of the four track railway.

In 2016 the former L&M was still a busy main line railway carrying a variety of traffic. It was electrified through the site of Seedley station in 2013.

Sources:

  • Britains First Trunk Line - N W Webster - Adams & Dart - 1972
  • Encyclopaedia of British Railway Companies - C Awdry - Guild Publishing -1990
  • Liverpool & Manchester Railway - D Singleton - Dalesman 1975
  • Liverpool & Manchester Railway Operations 1831 -1845 – T Donaghy – David & Charles - 1972 

To see the other closed stations on the Liverpool & Manchester Railway click on the station name: Liverpool Crown Street, Huyton Quarry, Lea Green, Collins Green, Parkside 1st, Parkside 2nd, Kenyon Junction, Glazebury and Bury Lane, Flow Moss, Astley, Lambs Cottage, Barton Moss 1st, Barton Moss 2nd, Weaste, Cross Lane, Ordsall Lane, Manchester Liverpool Road


The street level building at Seedley station seen in the early years of the 20th century.
Photo from the John Mann collection




Seedley station shown on a six-inch scale map from 1894.


Seedley station shown on a 1:2,500 scale map from 1916.


The slow line platforms at Seedley station seen looking west in the 1920s. Up slow line trains called at the platform to the right and down slow line trains the platform to the left.


The site of Seedley station looking west in March 1975 after the line had reverted to being a double track railway. The station had been completely demolished.
Photo by John Mann


The site of Seedley Station looking west in 2003. Parts of the station wall can be seen in the picture.
Photo by Bevan Price

 

 

 

[Source: Bevan Price & Paul Wright]


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